OHS



If you are having trouble viewing the document, you may download the document.

Student Testimonies

OHS Student Testimonies

Contact us

  • OAKHAVEN HIGH SCHOOL

    3125 LADBROOK ROAD

    MEMPHIS,TENNESSEE 38118

    PHONE (901)416-2300

    FAX (901) 416-2301

    schools.scsk12.org/oakhaven-hs

     

    Interest Form Link: 

     

    Future Incredible Hawks Survey

     


  • Shared Vision

    By 2025, 80% of Oakhaven’s seniors will graduate equipped with college and career readiness skills; 90% will graduate on time; and 100% of the seniors who graduate college and career ready will enroll in post-secondary opportunities.
     

    Mission Statement

    To achieve our mission, OHS has set a mission to be THE school where ALL students have access to high quality teaching and learning in every classroom everyday
     
     
     
    The instruction that OHS students are exposed to in the OHS classrooms will be instruction that equips them with 21st century knowledge and skills.
     
    To ensure our culture and climate facilitate progress towards achieving our vision and mission, the OHS staff and students will exercise a set of CORE values. 

    The Core Values are:
    1. Hardwork
    2. Ambition
    3. Willingness
    4. Knowledge
    5. The ability to soar above the rest
     
     

OHS CLUBS, SPORTS, AND PROGRAMS

  • ACT Bootcamps

    AJROTC-ARMED DRILL TEAM

    AJROTC-COLOR GUARD

    AJROTC-LEADERSHIP

    AJROTC-RAIDERS CHALLENGE

    AJROTC-RIFLE/MARKSMENSHIP TEAM

    AJROTC-ROBOTICS

    AJROTC-UNARMED DRILL TEAM

    ART AND POETRY CLUB

    AP (COMP SCIENCE)

    BAND

    BAND-COLOR GUARD

    BASEBALL

    BASKETBALL CLUB

    BASKETBALL GIRLS AND BOYS

    BLACK HISTORY PROGRAM

    CHEERLEADERS

    CHESS CLUB

    CHOIR

    CLASS PIANO 

    COLLEGE FAIRS

    CODING

    CROSS COUNTRY GIRLS AND BOYS

    DEBATE TEAM

    DRIP CLUB

    DUAL CREDIT (AMER HIST, INTRO BUS, PRE-CAL, SPEECH & COMM, WORLD HIS)

    ENGLISH HONOR SOCIETY

    EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN NIGHT

    FBLA

    FCA (FELLOWSHIP OF CHISTIAN ATHLETES)

    FLY 9TH GRADE ACADEMY 

    FINANCIAL AID NIGHT

    FOOTBALL 

    FR/SOPH/JUN/SENIOR NIGHTS

    GARDEN CLUB

    HAWK AMBASSADORS

    HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH CELEBRATION

    HISTORY CLUB

    INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 

    JOURNALISM

    NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY

    NATIONAL TECHNOLOGY HONOR SOCIETY (NTHS)

    O-ZONE BLOCK PARTY

    RUNNING CLUB

    PEP SQUAD CLUB

    PERFORMING BAND CLUB

    PHARMACY TECH PROGRAM

    PROM

    QUARTERLY HONORS PROGRAM

    SELF-CARE CLUB

    SCIENCE OLYMPIAD CLUB

    SHE LEADS

    SOFTBALL

    SOCCER BOYS AND GIRLS 

    SPANISH CLUB

    STEM ROBOTICS

    STUDENT COUNCIL

    STUDENT OF THE MONTH MONTHLY SPOTLIGHT

    TALENT SHOW

    THE BOOK CLUB

    THE HAWK EYE (NEWSLETTER)

    TRACK AND FIELD BOYS AND GIRLS

    TSA (TECH STUDENT ASSOCIATION)

    WEIGHTLIFTING 

    VOLLEYBALL

    YEARBOOK

     

     


  • Did You Know? 

              Birds and people are "sight animals." For both, the eyes are the dominant sense organs, vastly more important than their inferior sense of smell. The reasons for our sensory similarity to birds can be found in human evolutionary history. At one point the ancestors of Homo sapiens were small, tree-dwelling primates. When leaping from limb to limb and snatching of insect prey with the hands, sharp, binocular vision was very handy; those of our forebears that tried instead to smell the location of a branch on which to land were unlikely to survive to reproduce. And since in the breezy treetops odors quickly dissipate, they do not provide good cues for detecting food, enemies, or mates. Birds, flying higher and faster than primates leap, naturally also evolved sight as their major device for orienting to the world.
    ​          Most birds have binocular vision. It is especially well developed in predators that must precisely estimate ever-changing distances to moving prey. Their eyes tend to be rotated toward the front of the head, so that the visual fields of each eye overlap to some degree. This trend is most pronounced in owls, whose eyes are almost as completely overlapping in field as ours. Small birds that are likely to be prey for raptors tend to have their eyes set on the sides of the head, permitting them to watch for danger in all directions. At the opposite extreme from the owls are the woodcocks, mud probers with eyes set high and back on the head, out of the way of vegetation and splattering mud and in a position to look out for predators. In fact, the woodcock has better binocular vision to the rear than to the front!
              The term "hawk-eyed" accurately describes many birds. For example, both raptors that must see prey at great distances and seed eaters that must pick tiny objects off the ground have eyes designed for high "visual acuity" -- the capacity to make fine discriminations. There is, in fact, evidence that hawks can distinguish their prey at something like two or three times the distance that a human being can detect the same creature. Interestingly, even with such visual acuity, Cooper's Hawks are known to hunt quail by their calls.
              One way that birds have attained such a high degree of acuity is by having relatively large eyes. A human eye weighs less than I percent of the weight of the head, whereas a starling's eye accounts for some 15 percent of its head weight. But more than size alone appears to account for the astonishing performance of the eyes of hawks. Evolution has arranged the structure of their eyes so that each eye functions very much like a telescope. The eye has a somewhat flattened lens placed rather far from the retina, giving it a long "focal length," which produces a large image. A large pupil and highly curved cornea admit plenty of light to keep the image on the retina bright.